Fly men to the moon: Ad Astra and the toxic masculinity of space films

Brad Pitts saga is the latest sci-fi film to fall back on stereotypes of heroic men and emotional women Brad Pitt has not minced his words while talking about his new space epic Ad Astra, in which he plays a stoic, closed-off astronaut with daddy issues. What we were really digging at was this definition of masculinity, he recently stated, and lamented having grown up in an era where we were taught to be strong, not show weakness, dont be disrespected. That is bang on-message with #MeToo Hollywood, but Ad Astra also brings home how gendered the space film has always been. Factually minded films from this genre The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, First Man have had little choice but …

Ad Astra review: Brad Pitt reaches the stars in superb space-opera with serious daddy issues

The actor blasts off in search of long-lost pops Tommy Lee Jones in James Grays intergalactically po-faced take on Apocalypse Now Brad Pitt is an intergalactic Captain Willard, taking a fraught mission up-river in James Grays Ad Astra, an outer-space Apocalypse Now which played to rapt crowds at the Venice film festival. In place of steaming jungles, this gives us existential chills. Instead of Viet Cong soldiers, it provides man-eating baboons and pirates riding dune-buggies. Its an extraordinary picture, steely and unbending and assembled with an unmistakable air of wild-eyed zealotry. Ad Astra, be warned, is going all the way – and it double-dares us to buckle up for the trip. Set in the near future, this casts Pitt as …

Tarantino’s gruesome revenge fantasies are growing more puerile and misogynistic | Caspar Salmon

The director dials up the stomach-churning violence in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. If only he had something meaningful to say Compare and contrast two screen deaths. In Quentin Tarantinos second film, Pulp Fiction in 1994, John Travoltas Vincent Vega accidentally shoots Marvin, a minor character, in the face. The killing happens mid-sentence, in the blink of an eye; in the process Vince covers himself and his acolyte Jules in blood and guts. The scene is played for laughs and succeeds: the horror and suddenness of the event coax an appalled hilarity from viewers, exacerbated by the two hitmens reaction, which is to bicker about mundane practicalities. In Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Manson family member Susan Atkins, …

Bruce Lee’s daughter hits out at father’s portrayal in Tarantino film

Shannon Lee says that actor depicting Lee was directed to be a caricature in Quentin Tarantinos Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Bruce Lees daughter, Shannon, has hit out at the portrayal of her father in Hollywood, Quentin Tarantinos new film set in the late 1960s film industry, saying it was disheartening and uncomfortable. 2019 TV show Warrior, based on one of her fathers unmade projects. Lee added: What Im interested in is raising the consciousness of who Bruce Lee was as a human being and how he lived his life. All of that was flushed down the toilet in this portrayal, and made my father into this arrogant punching bag.

‘I reject your hypothesis’: Tarantino lashes out at criticism over female actors

Director reacts angrily to questions about limited screen time for Margot Robbie in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, and violence against female characters Quentin Tarantino responded sharply to questions about the portrayal of women in his films and disgraced director premiered to rave reviews at the Cannes film festival on Tuesday evening, was in no mood to discuss difficult topics, at one point snapping I reject your hypothesis at a journalist who asked why Rosemarys Baby. I like that a lot. However, the director said that he had not spoken to Polanski before making his film. Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, Tarantino and Margot Robbie at the press conference. Photograph: JOHN PHILLIPS/POOL/EPA When asked why there was such fascination around …

Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood to have world premiere at Cannes

Director has not left the editing room in months to complete much-anticipated film in time for festival unveiling Quentin Tarantinos much-anticipated Manson-era drama Once Upon a Time in Hollywood will have its world premiere at the Cannes film festival after all. Tarantinos film was conspicuous by its absence from the original announcement in April. At the time, Canness general delegate Thierry Frmaux had said that Tarantino was still editing the film and it was not ready for the festival. However, Frmaux said that the film would now be added to the competition for the Palme dOr, saying: Quentin Tarantino, who has not left the editing room in four months, is a real, loyal and punctual child of Cannes. Like for …