Two whales flown from Shanghai aquarium to sanctuary in Iceland

Female 12-year-old beluga whales Little Grey and Little White arrive at Klettsvik Bay Two beluga whales from a Shanghai aquarium have arrived in Iceland to live out their days in a unique marine sanctuary that conservationists hope will become a model for rehoming 3,000 of the creatures currently in captivity. Little Grey and Little White, two 12-year-old female belugas, left behind their previous lives entertaining visitors at the Changfeng Ocean World and were flown across the globe in specially tailored containers. Little White and Little Grey perform during a show at Ocean World, Shanghai. Photograph: Aaron Chown/PA The whales, which each weigh about 900kg and are four metres long, will continue their epic journey by truck and ferry to the …

Camera firm distances itself from Tiananmen Square advert

Leica, whose biggest growth market is China, say short film was not officially sanctioned Western companies trying to do business in China learned long ago that they must bow, at least in part, to the political demands of an authoritarian state. So when the German camera-maker Leica Tiananmen Square crackdown appears to have been an extraordinary and potentially very expensive mistake. China is currently Leicas biggest growth market, told the dating back years and taking in several award-winning short films in a similar vein to the most recent one. One of the ads directors told the tank man photo that came to define the Chinese protesters peaceful showdown with heavily armed authorities. This film is dedicated to those who lend …

China Finds Phone-Wielding Tourists and Telescopes Don’t Mesh

If a giant telescope observes the universe, and no one around can take a picture of it, does it really exist? The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope—located in Guizhou, China—will have to find out. New regulations, put into effect in early April, ban (among other things) cell phones, smart wearables, drones, and digital cameras within 5 kilometers of the dish and impose uncomfortably large fines on those who break the rules. Officials ratified the restrictions because tourists flocked to the once-remote area after the government built science-centric attractions nearby and promoted the telescope as a vacation destination. But with tourists come electronics, and electronics emit radio waves. Those earthly waves can easily shout down the whispers from the cosmos. As …