Get on one, comrade! The story of Russias post-Soviet rave scene

For a brief period in the early 90s, anything seemed possible for the pioneers of a new youth culture. But as a new film reveals, things didnt turn out quite as hoped In 1991, the Soviet Union finally crumbled under the weight of its own contradictions. As the walls came tumbling down, it looked as though a space was finally opening up for young people to express themselves after the crushing conformity of the communist years. For us it was awesome when the Soviet Union fell, because we could fool around, says artist Illya Chichkan. And thats exactly what we did. We experimented with psychedelics and psychotropics. We tried everything. Rave promoter tsky was equally optimistic: It looked like the …

The Chemical Brothers: ‘People were crying because they hated us so much’

Three decades after their inauspicious start, Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons think the spirit of 90s rave culture, as captured on their new album, can help heal Brexit wounds In a west London pub on a Wednesday lunchtime, the Chemical Brothers are taking a break from preparing for the smallest DJ gig of their recent careers. Twenty-seven years since they began playing records together as students in Manchester, under the unfortunate and short-lived pseudonym the 237 Turbo Nutters, Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons forays into DJing usually take place on the grand scale of their spectacular festival headline sets. Such huge gigs have become useful circumstances for road-testing new material: the pair knew they were on to a winner with …

Keith Flint: the neon demon who started a fire under British pop

By gleefully escalating the moral panic around British dance culture, the Prodigy frontman showed that rave could be the true successor to rocknroll Like virtually every 90s dance act that unexpectedly ascended from releasing underground club tracks to selling a lot of albums, the Chemical Brothers, the Art of Noise and alt-rock band the Breeders and partly down to the video, in which Flint relentlessly played up to the camera. Not for the last time, the sight of him on national television provoked complaints from the audience. His persona fitted the moment perfectly: thanks to the Criminal Justice Act and a spate of high-profile ecstasy-related deaths most notably that of Leah Betts, an 18-year-old Essex school pupil the British dance …