‘The future of life on Earth lies in the balance’ a picture essay

Almost 600 conservation experts have signed a letter by the wildlife charity WWF, published to coincide with UN report into loss of biodiversity Almost 600 conservation experts have signed the Call4Nature open letter written by wildlife charity WWF, which is being published to coincide with the IPBES report (see letter below). Overfishing We are overfishing our oceans at an alarming rate and choking them with plastic and other pollutants. If we want to see healthy seas that will continue to provide us with food, we need to stop this over-exploitation, protect our incredible marine environments and make sustainable fishing the norm, as we see here. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, chef and vice-president of Fauna and Flora International Conservation of Atlantic Tuna) regulations …

Jared Harris: My wife can’t believe how I keep getting bumped off!

From Mad Men to The Crown, the actor is used to big exits. As new disaster drama Chernobyl launches, he talks about cover-ups, climate change shame and his hellraising dad Richard Jared Harris says that if only he had played Lane Pryce as he was meant to, he would have probably lasted the duration of The Crown was inevitably done for by a coronary thrombosis. In his latest TV drama, The Terror, about the Royal Navys treacherous 19th-century trip into the unknown, are three of the great contemporary TV dramas. And Chernobyl looks like its going to be another. A tense, beautifully written five-parter about Greta Thunberg has addressed EU politicians in Brussels. Its awful that its being left to …

A Blazing Hot Coal Seam Shows How Microbes Can Spring to Life

Just past the intersection of Centre and Locust in Centralia, Pennsylvania, the microbiologist Tammy Tobin turned the wheel of her aging Prius sharply to the right. As the windshield wipers whipped furiously back and forth to fend off the driving sleet—a reminder that winter had yet to bid farewell—Tobin announced, “We’re here.” We were at the base of a grassy slope nestled behind the SS. Peter and Paul Cemetery. It looked like any of the other countless knolls tucked in the anthracite hills of eastern Pennsylvania. But almost 50 meters beneath our feet lurked a hidden menace. Centralia was burning. Or rather, the coal seam under what used to be the town of Centralia was burning. The coal has burned …