I Tweeted Out My Phone Numberand Rediscovered Humanity

The calls come in during twilight. At first, the tone is a whisper. They’re trying to see if I’m someone they’re comfortable with. I look for a common interest: food, film, music—anything that connects us as humans. After that, I let them lead. I’ve been taking phone calls from strangers for a few months now. This practice started after I was digitally shamed on Twitter. I had written an op-ed in The New York Times worrying about our culture of shame. I empathized with a white teen growing up in a conservative, Midwestern home. In my heart, I know a couple things to be true. We’re all human beings that deserve the opportunity to change or grow. Speaking our truth …

I was filled with self-loathing after losing my novel on my laptop Russell Crowe came to my rescue | Brigid Delaney

While my general level of chaos has made life hard, the Gladiator is my guardian angel You dream of a novel long before you write it. It ferments in some depthless place in your subconscious and, when its ready to pop out, it will tap on your skull like a spoon against a hardboiled egg. Once the tapping starts, the best thing you can do is just clear your desk and your diary and get to work. This magical thing was happening to me a novel was knocking around in my skull. I had a rough go at it last year. It didnt work. I threw it out on 1 January and started again. I spent most of April writing, …

How the Videogame Aesthetic Flows Into All of Culture

When the science fiction film Edge of Tomorrow, directed by Doug Liman, came out in 2014, WIRED called it “the best videogame you can’t play.” The film’s main character, Bill Cage, repeats the same day again and again—a day of futuristic combat with aliens. Each time he dies, Cage wakes up again on the previous day. Everything is as before, with the crucial difference that he remembers all the previous versions of that fatal next day. The repetitions are the film’s equivalent of a videogame’s replayability, and Cage’s battle skills improve, just as a player’s skills improve through replay. But Cage is not a player. He is a character in a narrative film, so the repeated days are in fact …

Avengers: Endgame Broke Nearly Every Box-Office Record

Hello and congratulations on surviving the Battle of Winterfell! (Don't worry, we'll get to Game of Thrones soon enough.) This is, of course, the latest edition of The Monitor, WIRED's roundup of all the biggest pop culture news. What's in store? Well, for one, Avengers: Endgame did even better at the box office than anyone expected—and people expected a lot. Also, Twitter got really excited about everything going down in Westeros last night. Let's get into it. Avengers: Endgame Just $1.2 Billion. Yes, Billion As expected, Marvel's latest movie broke nearly every box-office record imaginable this past weekend, bringing in some $350 in North America and $1.2 billion total worldwide. Avengers: Endgame, which was initially projected to make $850 million …